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This section contains videos portraying the beauty of the Kimberley region, our lifestyle and  industries. Captions and transcripts are available for each video.

How liveable is the Kimberley?

Transcript

00:00
[Music]
01:00
[Applause]
01:01
[Music]
01:04
[Applause]
01:06
are some of the best things about living
01:08
in Broome the Kimberley uh the the
01:11
number one place I don’t think there’s
01:13
anywhere in Australia and maybe further
01:16
abroad that has better weather in Broome
01:18
over the winter months it is the best
01:21
weather on the continent no matter what
01:23
you know and and I challenge anyone to
01:25
say any different
01:26
I love the climate I love the people I
01:28
love the opportunities it’s it’s not an
01:31
easy place to do business but they are
01:34
but you know I think once you need to
01:36
understand the challenges and and work
01:40
hard to overcome those challenges and
01:41
that becomes a competitive advantage so
01:44
but I mean what a wonderful environment
01:46
to work in and and fly people over you
01:48
know we’re very privileged to be able to
01:50
do that and and you know we’ve where
01:52
we’re gonna be here for a while yet to
01:55
come I probably got one of the most
01:57
amazing jobs in the world
01:58
I can be tasting some food off a new
02:01
menu at one of our locations I can be
02:04
talking to people about the industry or
02:08
I can be out on a boat undertaking any
02:11
number of different pairing activities
02:13
which are always interesting and I
02:15
always learn from so yeah I feel like
02:17
I’m a pretty lucky person to be honest I
02:20
am in I am five years old and I love
02:26
crew
02:26
[Music]
02:27
I love living a broom the beach is
02:31
really nice there’s lots of water and
02:34
fruit trees and I like it because I have
02:39
a pool in my house I love living in the
02:42
country
02:42
I I’ve got children I think it’s a
02:46
magnificent place to bring out kids just
02:48
the outdoor lifestyle camping access to
02:52
you know fishing crabbing you know
02:55
beautiful whales coming through the I
02:57
mean there’s no better place along the
02:59
coastline really we can get that close
03:01
to whales and then to have the Kimberley
03:03
wilderness at your doorstep I think the
03:07
place is just magnificent we are really
03:10
lucky to live here so I think you’ve got
03:12
to remind yourself you know on the days
03:14
that you can’t get something at Kohl’s
03:15
or you know something really annoying
03:17
and seemingly small crops are up you
03:21
just have to remind yourself how lucky
03:24
we are to live where we live so for that
03:27
I’m really grateful to have ended up
03:29
here you know the Kimberley Coast is a
03:32
ridiculously unique tropical marine
03:34
environment everyone says that but this
03:36
one is this one’s got the largest
03:38
tropical tides in the world overlaid
03:42
across two and a half thousand islands
03:45
and one of the most pristine
03:48
environments left on the globe that’s
03:50
also got the oldest living culture still
03:54
active and still embedded into that
03:56
story it’s just a miraculous place for
03:59
every reason now instead of sending your
04:02
kids away to high school the Broome
04:04
senior high school is one of the best
04:07
performing high schools in the state and
04:09
so you know we’re completely comfortable
04:10
with our kids just now remaining in
04:12
Broome and getting a really good
04:15
opportunity for education locally you
04:18
know the place is becoming more and more
04:22
connected and I think that just goes to
04:25
make it a place it’s easy for people to
04:29
live permanently which i think is is
04:31
really important that’s what that’s when
04:33
we’re going to start to see more and
04:34
more investment back into the ridge
04:36
I don’t want it in the house except for
04:43
me I get to enjoy this country but also
04:49
I get to look after my parents my mom
04:55
and grandmother and great-grandfather
04:59
grandfathers grandmothers all lived up
05:01
here all grew up up here and we know
05:05
what’s here and what we need to protect
05:08
and so we hopefully can pass that on to
05:11
our next generation how to protect this
05:15
place these guys walk out they know what
05:17
they see they can survive here they’ll
05:19
both tell where the food is they know
05:21
where the water is all of those sorts of
05:22
things and and I don’t know that they
05:26
know how much they know
05:27
because you all these mob they’re
05:30
driving up the road they’re not saying
05:31
that there’s a bit of green there’s a
05:33
bit of dirt there’s a bit of whatever
05:34
and it’s pretty but that’s the extent of
05:38
it we really need to appreciate what the
05:41
body people here know and how they
05:44
interact with what they have and how
05:47
they know how to protect it and respect
05:49
them
05:52
you

Tourism

Transcript

00:00
[Music]
00:54
[Music]
01:05
[Music]
01:09
now the industry now is faring
01:12
reasonably well it’s a lot harder than
01:15
it ever used to be so you know in the
01:18
Association itself is about 25 members
01:20
and it’s growing I mean there’s a lot of
01:23
small members spoiled small groups of
01:26
people are starting up activities and
01:28
it’s it’s down to at least out from
01:30
whale watching at a broom all the way
01:32
through to bigger ships traveling up and
01:34
down the up and down the Kimberley Coast
01:36
I think the Kimberley will ever go out
01:39
of fashion
01:39
because it is one of the true
01:42
wildernesses that we have left but the
01:44
Kimberley itself with extra ships coming
01:48
in I mean at some stage we’re gonna have
01:50
to cap how many vessels come through the
01:52
area it’s the it’s a lot harder these
01:55
days I mean I’ve been in industry a long
01:56
time to actually get the bookings and
01:59
and the interest specifically to what
02:02
we’re doing in the smaller operators
02:04
that are going in and out of every kind
02:06
of river system and really exploring the
02:09
Kimberley it’s proving quite difficult
02:11
for especially smaller operators that
02:14
they’re getting impacted quite a lot of
02:16
life
02:22
it’s more difficult to operate the
02:24
kimberley these days well there’s a lot
02:26
more regulation there’s a lot a lot more
02:28
regulations especially for the vessels
02:32
of our size in the true north and and
02:34
some of the coral expedition boats and
02:36
things like that it’s when I first
02:38
started that we didn’t have as much
02:40
presence through the Aboriginal
02:41
communities along the coastline they
02:43
making a really big impact at the moment
02:45
and they’re impacting in a way which is
02:47
both good and bad I mean they’re very
02:50
welcomed as far as the Kimberley marine
02:53
tourism industry is concerned would love
02:55
to have more input from the local
02:58
communities and local Aboriginal culture
03:00
if you can actually showcase that along
03:03
with everything else we sees it’s the
03:04
perfect storm but at the moment we’re
03:07
kind of battling through a little bit
03:08
because the coastline itself has a range
03:11
of different communities and some of
03:13
them are different levels of advancement
03:16
in their actual in their preparation and
03:18
an actual business development so that’s
03:21
proving quite difficult for us at the
03:23
moment it would be great if they’re all
03:25
at the same sort of level and worked as
03:27
one unit – we had a Kimberley cultural
03:29
visitors past that we could all
03:31
contribute to at this stage it’s it’s
03:35
coming along it’s coming along a little
03:37
slower than the industry would probably
03:39
like to see it’s not something we can’t
03:41
get over but it is making it harder –
03:44
yeah make a dollar especially for the
03:46
smaller garden we’ve just launched a
03:48
brand new sister company – The Great
03:50
Escape
03:51
go horizontal Falls to us and we’re
03:54
offering day tours from Broome up to
03:57
Cockatoo Island and then into the
04:00
Kimberley so we’ve got two cruise boats
04:03
stationed out the front of Cockatoo
04:05
Island and yeah we’re leading groups
04:07
down through yappi sound into Talbot
04:10
they they get to traverse the falls in
04:12
the boats and really just explore that
04:15
Kimberley wilderness around that area so
04:17
very picturesque and
04:20
yeah a lot of fun look it’s very late in
04:24
the season for us you know we had a few
04:26
challenges but looking back now we feel
04:29
that it took the right amount of time to
04:31
get to where we have we’ve been able to
04:34
forge some fantastic relationships with
04:36
traditional owners and other groups in
04:38
the Kimberley who will be pertinent to
04:42
our success so I think that we all have
04:44
to Bend together and not only promote
04:47
our own products but work together it’s
04:50
about collaboration so yeah I guess
04:53
don’t just think about what you’re doing
04:55
think about how you could extend from
04:57
that and how it could benefit other
04:59
parties in the region and I think you
05:02
can get really creative with the product
05:04
it might even become something that you
05:06
didn’t even imagine initially just by
05:08
being a bit more open-minded about who
05:10
you involve in the new venture
05:12
[Music]
05:21
the business span established in the
05:24
Kimberley for about 34 years with its
05:26
main head office based out of Canon are
05:29
it’s been operating in the Pilbara for
05:31
about the last eight years and we’re
05:34
very excited to be to now have a base
05:36
back in look there’s a number of
05:40
benefits of connecting their Kimberley
05:42
into the Pilbara the opportunity for for
05:45
FIFO into the Pilbara from from brain I
05:49
think is great opportunity for fir
05:51
brewing and the economy up here people
05:53
can live in a you know in a wonderful
05:55
location and you know a great
05:57
environment and it’s closer to the pill
06:00
brother and than Perth is and a lot of
06:02
people are travelling from Perth and
06:03
south of Perth you know why aren’t
06:04
they’re traveling from the Kimberley
06:06
it’s it’s mainly because there’s no way
06:08
of getting there at the moment other
06:09
than Viper I think there’s there’s
06:11
there’s a very low hanging fruit for
06:15
increased tourism interest and activity
06:17
in the Kimberley you know I think that
06:20
the cost and limitations around air
06:23
access into the into the West Kimberley
06:27
certainly has an impact in into the East
06:29
Kimberley there’s there’s no direct near
06:32
access from the southeastern states of
06:34
the country at all there’s 300 to 350
06:38
thousand people a year traveling to all
06:40
around and we’ve got about 20,000 people
06:42
coming to the bungle bungles you know
06:45
the bungle bungles is spread over 450
06:48
square kilometres all already spread
06:50
over about nine square kilometres the
06:53
opportunity to open up the bungle bungle
06:56
on the East Kimberley to the rest of the
06:58
world is is not difficult
07:00
we just need to all work together to
07:03
make sure we can get better air access
07:04
into the state and and and it could be
07:08
an absolute game changer for tourism in
07:10
the Kimberley
07:11
[Music]
07:28
we’ve been involved in a couple of ways
07:30
you know by default we’re involved in it
07:32
because we just need to have tourists
07:34
all over their properties I mean our
07:35
fishing and camping and that’s
07:37
everything so we’re so we were sort of
07:38
reluctant participants in tourism for
07:40
probably the last 20 years you know
07:42
we’ve named the call of the Kimberley
07:43
and that’s after named after a book
07:45
actually that was written on the first
07:47
guys the first white guys that came up
07:49
from King Jarrah and I’m started year to
07:52
station in 1881 and so we’re basically
07:55
just getting it trying to put it
07:56
together an experience where people
07:58
didn’t you know if you want to have a
08:00
look and understand a little bit about
08:01
what goes on on a station and you know a
08:03
bit more of the internal workings rather
08:05
than the you know the sort of
08:07
theoretical ideas of what goes on and so
08:10
what’s happened in the last few years
08:11
we’ve sort of got into the you know
08:14
there the space where look this is an
08:15
opportunity at some we see there’s only
08:18
ever increasing and rather than just
08:19
sitting back and being frustrated by an
08:21
unmanaged tourism that’s happening by
08:24
default I’m how about we get involved in
08:26
being but you know putting something on
08:27
the table so we’re sort of basically we
08:30
know we’ve had that bungles caravan park
08:31
and our area up there quite a few years
08:33
now so that’s a bit of a you know almost
08:35
a service sort of industry there where
08:36
we basically satisfying it I need but um
08:40
but we’ve now gone into tourism on the
08:41
station side of it probably a lot of
08:43
it’s almost driven by some of the
08:44
contact we’ve had with the tourist side
08:46
of it in the UM at the bundles because
08:49
people are they drive from the Kimberley
08:50
they go from Cannon arrow to broom and
08:52
although they see a lot of beautiful
08:53
things no one really understands what’s
08:55
going on on the other side of the fence
08:57
and so we sort of looked at until you
08:59
know people are desperate to get out of
09:00
it out of town and have a look around
09:02
and don’t see what’s going on on the
09:04
station somewhere so what you know
09:06
understand the cattle industry of bit
09:08
and so through this magnificent spot on
09:10
the river beautiful fishing all the
09:11
wonderful things for tourism and and we
09:14
use used to basically use it for six or
09:16
eight weeks a year
09:16
so we thought there’s a facility there
09:18
let’s go and do something so we put in
09:20
our 12 Safari tents and and done all the
09:23
home setup and
09:25
and basically gone into that space so we
09:27
had a bit of a soft start this year just
09:28
um testing it out and so next year will
09:31
be our full year of operation there so
09:33
we’ll see how it goes
09:34
[Music]
09:41
[Music]
09:43
g’day my name is James Brown I’m the
09:45
managing director of Cigna PayPal fun
09:48
brooms obviously famous for its pearling
09:51
industry brooms a great local market
09:53
because people come to broom with
09:55
aspirations of owning a broom that’s led
10:06
us to now being able to expand the
10:08
business model out of broom and even out
10:11
of the out of the Australian South Sea
10:13
pearl industry with our recent
10:16
investment into broken Bay pearls which
10:19
is a which is a New South Wales pearling
10:21
company that utilizes a local species
10:24
which is the same local species that
10:26
Mikimoto started the industry with in in
10:28
Japan commonly known as a Koya we’re
10:31
hoping that being able to take the
10:35
synergies of the new Signet Bay business
10:36
model and and developed broken bay with
10:40
those and hopefully tapping into a much
10:43
larger customer base in New South Wales
10:46
there’s only a about an hour north of
10:48
Sydney we really want to firstly open
10:52
new markets but secondly we want to
10:54
really create the ability to talk to
10:57
consumers and have a much bigger impact
10:58
on trying to change consumer perceptions
11:02
or at least improve the the
11:05
misconceptions which we believe will
11:08
then help drive a whole range of
11:10
processes through the the wholesale
11:12
market all the way to retail so that so
11:14
that Australian high quality Australian
11:16
product can compete with its
11:19
international competitors
11:23
so one of the big investments right now
11:26
in the Broom region is the upgrade of
11:29
the cape leveque road I think it’s only
11:31
logical that it does get completely
11:33
sealed rather than left 5050 the way it
11:36
is now there’s obviously some concerns
11:38
about what kind of social impacts that
11:40
might have cultural environmental
11:42
impacts but I think the good news is
11:44
that the Dampier Peninsula now is better
11:46
positioned than ever to actually try and
11:48
tackle those issues we’ve got we’ve got
11:50
traditional owner governance quite well
11:53
established up here now we’ve got
11:56
fantastic range of programmes so there’s
11:59
a range of assets now that I believe can
12:02
be easily leveraged to to kind of
12:04
minimize the impacts and actually start
12:06
to maximize hopefully the opportunities
12:08
then of course you’ve got aquaculture
12:10
you’ve still got an existing pearling
12:12
industry here which I think could
12:14
recover and and be a big player again
12:16
you’ve got the Kimberley aquaculture
12:18
zone which is 30 miles right behind me
12:21
that’s Australia’s biggest ocean
12:24
barramundi farm which is undergoing a
12:27
big investment right now you’ve got
12:29
marine parks that are now being
12:31
developed that will stretch right down
12:33
to the peninsula you’ve got a whole
12:35
range of private and government
12:37
investments that are already starting to
12:39
drive investment and drive additional
12:42
activity so you know I think there’s
12:44
that that’s a really exciting space
12:45
[Music]
12:58
alderman wilderness camp has 32 family
13:03
roots we have 25 camping spaces we have
13:08
a restaurant we have a cafe we have
13:11
entertainment and we provide a venue
13:15
that can host up to 300 people if we
13:18
need to in various camping forms Beach
13:21
shelters those sorts of things
13:22
throughout the season and we try to be a
13:26
community hub here we run micro
13:29
businesses out of culture men so lots of
13:32
different tours dizziness to a product
13:35
we have charters so that’s that’s cool
13:39
to me it has you know good and bad
13:45
expectations that will come with the
13:49
road but I think what it means for our
13:53
mob up here is more freedom less Freight
13:59
cross people can buy cheap cars to go up
14:02
and down the road you know instead of
14:04
buying 40 or 50 thousand dollar vehicles
14:07
to to be able to live up here on a
14:10
tourism level it that’s definitely more
14:15
people it’s also a loss of some things
14:18
it’s a loss of that isolation it’s a
14:21
loss of that perhaps the adventure it’s
14:23
a loss of the iconic cape leveque Road
14:25
but I think that the communities up here
14:28
have a brilliant area its pristine it
14:31
hasn’t been over developed it hasn’t
14:33
been overrun that there’s a lot of
14:35
safeguards that I know everyone’s
14:37
working on just try and stop children or
14:42
the whole commercial area from becoming
14:44
that denuded place where the Nature has
14:46
been denatured because of just a number
14:49
of people and the pressure on it you’re
14:51
going to need people you know like an
14:54
entrance point up here so that you
14:56
control
14:58
who comes in and how many comes in it
15:00
has to be men
15:01
24/7 yeah happy if you have prior
15:04
bookings you can come up if you’re a day
15:07
visiting you get slapped with a sticker
15:09
on saying that you come through this
15:12
gate now you have to be back through
15:13
this gate about 6:00 if there’s not and
15:15
we have to be able to find them you know
15:18
know people if people say no we’re just
15:21
going up for a look I’m sorry you just
15:24
can’t go for look unless you pay day
15:27
visitor’s pass there’s also a difference
15:29
between properties signet babe or a
15:31
private like it’s a tourism business is
15:34
they don’t have a day pass system they
15:36
have their restaurant they have their
15:36
pool at the moment they offer that open
15:38
to people who might order lunch and
15:40
things like that so it’s it’s great for
15:41
people to go visit what are they going
15:43
to do with 50 people who want to use the
15:46
pool so we’re all gonna have to think
15:48
about that is our individual properties
15:50
as well as communities because when
15:53
people buy a community pass and they’re
15:55
thinking that also gives me access into
15:57
cool German will it or won’t it because
15:59
we’re not a community we are owned by
16:01
communities but we’re a private property
16:03
so those discussions again ongoing one
16:08
price to individual prices i we just
16:11
need to make the boundaries really clear
16:13
for people the expectations really clear
16:15
for people or we will you know become
16:19
subject to complaint and we can like
16:21
brian says we don’t want to do that at
16:22
the point where the road opens because
16:25
there’s always going to be taking shoes
16:27
there’s always going to be unforeseen
16:29
things that happen because you’ve done
16:31
this here and then that happened there
16:32
so we really need to have a clear
16:35
picture of where everyone’s thinking and
16:38
what needs to be done earlier rather
16:42
than later
16:44
you

Page last updated: Thu Dec 13 2018 12:56:39 PM

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Don't hesitate to call the Kimberley Development Commission with any queries or comments.

Send an Enquiry

7 Ebony Street (PO Box 620)
Kununurra Western Australia 6743

T: +61 8 9148 2100

Upstairs: Cnr Napier & Dampier Terrace (PO Box 172)
Broome, Western Australia 6725

T: +61 8 9194 3000

Derby Western Australia 6728

T: +61 8 9194 3000 (Broome)